*More Jazz Chords


Major 6, or 13 Chords


Here are some Major 6 or 13 jazz chords.  Chords
named, for example C6, C69, or C13 are the same thing.

These chords are written in music form below.


Play these chords above with the mp3 below.  Each chord should be played for 4 beats and just go around the circle!

6th,13 chords



If you want to download this mp3, it is on the previous page at the bottom titled "minor7thsmp3."    



Half Diminished Chords

Here we have half diminished chords.  Composers write half diminished chords 3 different ways but they mean the EXACT same thing:  B-7b5, Bm7b5,  Bmin7b5 or

Note that both options have exactly the same notes, just in a different order, so you can play these notes in any order and you will still be playing the correct chord.  For example, you can play C-7b5 with Eb on the bottom and you will have from bottom to top, Eb, Gb, Bb, and C.  In the second option, Gb is on the bottom and you have Gb, Bb, C, and Eb.  You can put the other two (Bb or C) on the bottom as well, like Bb, C, Eb, Gb. But the two options that I have shown throughout the circle are the most commonly used because the notes don't go too low or too high.   


These chords are written in music form below








You can practice this exercise by using the Reference sheet below. Follow the directions under Playing the Half dim-7b9-Major13 sheet.


Questions?  Contact me.

Contact form


7b9 Chords

There are really only three 7b9 chords.  So if you want to play a B7b9, D7b9, F7b9, or Ab7b9 you would play the notes in the first chord below IN ANY ORDER THAT YOU LIKE.  
 

 


To figure out the correct 7b9 chord in your head, you need to know what the b9 note is.  The b9 note of a chord is 1/2 step up from the name of the chord.  For example, if you want to play a C7b9 then you have to find the b9 note which is 1/2 step up from C, which is Db(C#).  You then go to the chart above and find the chord that has a C# in it.  If you want to play a G7b9 then the b9 is Ab(G#).   Look up to the chart and find the chord with an Ab(G#).  If you can find your chords this way, then there is really no need for you to look at the 7b9 chart below.  If you don't understand this explanation then you can just use the chart below.  
     
     






Dimished Chords


Composers write diminished chords 3 different ways: Ddim, Ddim7 and the other one has a little circle that means diminished:  

There are really only 3 diminished chords.  So if you wanted to play a Cdim, Ebdim, F#dim, or Adim, you would play the notes in the first chord below IN ANY ORDER THAT YOU LIKE.




Actually, these are the exact same notes as the 7b9 chords. BUT, if the chord is, say, Cdim, then you just find the chord that has a C in it.  You don't have to think 1/2 step up like in 7b9 chords.   Here are two examples of the difference in dim and 7b9:    



Notice that the dim chord actually has the note name of the chord in it.  For example, Cdim has C in the chord. But the 7b9 chords don't have the name of the chord in it.  For example, to play a C7b9 chord you have to find the b9, which is C# and play that dimished chord.   It's interesting to note that the Cdim and the Adim chords above have exactly the same notes, just in a different order, so you can play either one for each chord.  The same is true for the C7b9 and A7b9.  


Aug or + Chords 

Here we have Aug, or + chords.  Composers write these chords two different ways: either G+ or Gaug. They mean exactlly the same thing.  
There are really only 4 aug, or + chords.  So if you wanted to play a C aug, E aug, or G# aug, you would play the notes in the first chord below IN ANY ORDER THAT YOU LIKE.  




Ć
251HALFD.mp3
(2669k)
David Shoff,
Jul 22, 2014, 12:37 PM
Comments